Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from February, 2019

The 21 A Journey into the Land of Coptic Martyrs by Martin Mosebach

Although this was a well-written analysis of the tragic story of the Coptic martyrs, I didn't finish it. I greatly admire them and I think that the Coptic church is right to regard them as saints, but I don't think that I was interested enough in the subject to go on with the book, unfortunately.

I received this from Net Galley in return for an honest review.


Trafalgar The Untold Story of the Greatest Sea Battle in History by Nicholas Best

This is an interesting book with vivid descriptions of the actual battle with accounts from those involved.  It is well-worth reading for anyone who wants to learn more about Nelson and the battle. I especially liked the depiction of Lord Nelson. This was a moving and well-researched history.

I received this free ebook from Net Galley in return for an honest review.


Life Cycles-Relationships Discover Confluence. Is Your Relationship Fated? by Neil Killion

In this interesting book, Neil Killion applies his Life Cycles Theory to famous relationships, including friendships, and to careers. He also develops the concept of 'Confluence,' i.e. when couples share 'Significant Years' in common, and applies this to many relationships, such as Prince William and his beautiful wife, Catherine and Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor and business relationships, such as Charles and Louis Tiffany. The study of this theory can help you in your life and relationships.

The  Life Cycles Theory is a twelve-year cycle, with each twelfth year being 'A Year of Revolution,' markedd by new beginnings and achievements, through sudden upheavals. The seventh year after each Year of Revolution is also important, bringing with it a 'direction change and uphill challenge'.
On this basis, a Life Chart can be developed showing the 'Years of Revolution'and the 'Years of Broken Pathways' with their underlying themes.

This c…

Girl, Arise! A Catholic Feminist's Invitation to Live Boldly, Love Your Faith, and Change the World by Claire Swinarski

Is being a Catholic feminist an oxymoron? Many people think that it is, mainly because practising Catholic women usually don't believe in abortion. This is surprising because many early feminists were actually very anti-abortion.  Claire Swinarski discusses this, and other controversial questions in her book.  However, this is not just about divisive issues; it is an inspiring look at what it means to be a Catholic feminist in today's world.

Claire Swinarski didn't come from an especially religious home, and she was somewhat lapsed when she found herself at a low ebb and found herself in a welcoming Catholic group of women. This helped her see how women can assist each other and work together. Since then, she has gone from strength to strength, and eventually decided to create a Catholic feminist podcast which led to this book.

Another reason why people don't think that the words 'Catholic' and 'feminist' go together is because of the image of the good,…

The Grace of Enough Pursuing Less and Living More in a Throwaway Culture by Haley Stewart

When Haley Stewart and her husband and children moved to a 650-square-foot apartment on a working farm with no flushing toilets in central Texas, many friends thought that they were mad. They were going a long way from friends and family, and they were leaving a house for a small apartment. Daniel was going to receive much lower pay. How would they cope?

However, life in the city was a struggle. Daniel was working long hours at a job he didn't like and didn't believe in, and Haley was working part-time while homeschooling. Daniel missed out on the children's bedtime, and Haley was considering increasing her working hours. In the end, they worked out that it was an expensive way to live, because they were eating out or getting fast food more often. Family time was declining.

Moving to the farm was the best thing they ever did.  Haley combines the story of their move and how they regained what was essential in life with suggestions for readers in an interesting way. She has …

Mother Country A Novel by Irina Reyn St. Martin's Press

This is a beautifully written and insightful glimpse into the life of an Eastern European migrant in America and class distinction in New York.  Deeply-layered, it compares many different stratas of society, including the Ukrainians and Russians in America and it also compares life in Ukraine with modern life in the USA. Irina Reyn captures all this through her heroine Nadia's eyes, showing us a different world.

Nadia has a hard life in a seedy part of Brooklyn, struggling with two jobs. She works as a nanny for ambitious Regina and cares for an annoying old man at night, so that she can eventually bring her diabetic daughter to America from war-torn Ukraine.  She doesn't have many friends, isn't happy with her life, and she has a fraught relationship with her daughter Larisska, because she left her in war-torn Ukraine. The horrors of the war came suddenly, and the emptiness and snobbishness of life in New York doesn't compare favourably with the community spirit and t…